seattle

seattle in july

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Seattle feels forever ago. It kind of was-- these are from our road trip in July. This was a different Seattle from the first time we visited. Largely, we stayed in the outskirts except for the workshop I took.

There is so much good food here; though I'm sure I didn't need to tell you that. We stayed in Green Lake and walked around the water just before sunset in the evenings. The light was always perfect.

These photos are from Duck Island Ale House, Green Lake, Essex, Delancey, and The Fat Hen (can you tell we loved Ballard?). 

aran in seattle

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 As someone personally inspired by beautiful food, I'd developed my own ideas of food styling and how it worked. I remembered my days at Sunset when I spent my lunch breaks in the studio and watched the photographers and stylists prep and tweak, tweezer and heat gun whatever it was they were working on. 

Having read Cannelle et Vanille for the past few years, I assumed she was as meticulous and precise as the stylists I'd seen work in the past (I mean, look at her work). Then I took her workshop in Seattle.

The thing is, I don't know how to explain it. After reading past participants' posts about their experiences with her, I'd anticipated a kind of elegant, untouchable Aran (why do we create preconceived notions of people before meeting them?).  And this was true, in a way-- her style and approach are very elegant and she has a distinct intuitive aesthetic that is untouchable in that it's completely her own. Her process is the perfect balance between planned yet effortless, styled yet authentic. But more than that, the thing I'll always remember and take away from that day is that above everything, she was real.

Everything from her insistence on only using natural light to the admission that she breaks her own "rules." From the way she scrapes roasted carrots to show off their color to the way she lets salt drop and olive oil run the way they naturally like to.

"Everything beautiful and styled but real and authentic first." 

Thank you, Aran. 

 

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the pacific northwest

pnw road trip

We're closing in on the last few days of our road trip but I wanted to share a few of my favorite instagrams from the trip so far.

The Pacific Northwest is beautiful. This isn't our first trip up (and certainly not to Portland) but being here during the summer is something else. The mornings are misty and cool but by midday the sun is out and all you want to do is lay in the park with fried handmade pies and sweet tea. Or bike around the sea wall. Or swim in a lake during golden hour.

Our stops so far have been Portland, Vancouver, Seattle, and Portland again before we head home. Everything feels right: the air, the trees, the food, the everything. I like walking everywhere and remembering days by the meals we've shared. I can't get enough.

 

bits of seattle

wing luke museum
a portrait by david
macarons
the original starbucks
crab pot clam chowder (on the waterfront)
uwajimaya loot
pioneer square
space needle lights
the view from our last dinner

1. Paper dangling at the Wing Luke Museum in Chinatown.
2. Waiting for my buttermilk pancakes at brunch. (David had a sandwich).
3. Pretty macarons at a French bakery by the waterfront.
4. The original Starbucks! Too bad I don't drink coffee.
5. My first Seattle clam chowder at the Crab Pot. Perfect.
6. Our haul from the gigantic Japanese market Uwajimaya. Lots of treats for friends back home.
7. Pioneer Square after Salumi/ The Police Museum and before Wing Luke.
8. Holidays lights at the Space Needle.
9. Our view at Salty's during our last night. David had his first lobster and I had my first cioppino; all while the beautiful Seattle skyline sparkled across the water.

salumi

homey
a little morbid with the pig there
my beloved finocchiona
window-side seating
so european
salumi

It wasn't on my list, but I've wanted to go to Salumi ever since I did a presentation on Mario Batali for my Italian class last year (so basically it should have been on my list but I forgot to add it). Mario doesn't own it, but his parents founded the restaurant in the early 1900's using traditional Italian methods for curing meats. Since coming back from Europe, I've returned to my pescetarian diet so I was a little unsure of what I wanted to get once we finally got to Salumi. The thing is, though-- I live under the philosophy that dietary preferences should never hinder cultural/new experiences. I ate meat while I was in Europe (because really, how could I not in Italy?) and I decided to step outside the box again while traveling to Seattle. Anyway, the second I saw finocchiona on the menu board I knew I had have it because it was my favorite while I studied in Italy. It was a little different than what I remembered, but it still made me homesick for Florence. I think that's the mark of quality Italian food.